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Cannabis Research - Medical Uses - MS/spasticity/tremors/spasms


Authors
Clifford DB
Title
Tetrahydrocannabinol for tremor in multiple sclerosis.
Source
Annals of Neurology
Date
1983 Jun
Issue
13(6)
Pages
669-71
Abstract
Based on one patient's enthusiastic report, eight patients with multiple sclerosis, seriously disabled with tremor and ataxia, were given oral tetrahydrocannabinol. Two demonstrated improved motor coordination.

Authors
Petro DJ, Ellenberger C Jr
Title
Treatment of human spasticity with delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.
Source
Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Date
1981 Aug-Sep
Issue
21(8-9 Suppl)
Pages
413S-416S
Abstract
Spasticity is a common neurologic condition in patients with multiple sclerosis, stroke, cerebral palsy or an injured spinal cord. Animal studies suggest that THC has an inhibitory effect on polysynaptic reflexes. Some spastic patients claim improvement after inhaling cannabis. We tested muscle tone, reflexes, strength and performed EMGs before and after double-blinded oral administration of either 10 or 5 mg THC or placebo. The blinded examiner correctly identified the trials in which the patients received THC in seven of nine cases. For the group, 10 mg THC significantly reduced spasticity by clinical measurement (P less than 0.01). Quadriceps EMG interference pattern was reduced in those four patients with primarily extensor spasticity. THC was administered to eight other patients with spasticity and other CNS lesions. Responses varied, but benefit was seen in three of three patients with "tonic spasms." No benefit was noted in patients with cerebellar disease.

Authors
Malec J, Harvey RF, Cayner JJ
Title
Cannabis effect on spasticity in spinal cord injury.
Source
Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Date
1982 Mar
Issue
63(3)
Pages
116-8
Abstract
A study was done to examine the perceived effects of cannabis on spasticity of spinal cord injured persons. Data compiled from 43 questionnaires of spinal cord injured persons suggested the following: 1) spinal cord injured persons reported decreased spasticity with marijuana use; 2) present use of marijuana correlated positively with past use; and 3) the person's reference or peer group contributed significantly to current use. The study suggests the need to examine the relationship between measurable and reported changes in spasticity.

Id Code
88160795
Authors
Ungerleider JT, Andyrsiak T, Fairbanks L, Ellison GW, Myers LW
Title
Delta-9-THC in the treatment of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis.
Source
Advances in Alcohol & Substance Abuse
Date
1987
Issue
7(1)
Pages
39-50
Abstract
Marijuana is reported to decrease spasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis. This is a double blind, placebo controlled, crossover clinical trial of delta-9-THC in 13 subjects with clinical multiple sclerosis and spasticity. Subjects received escalating doses of THC in the range of 2.5-15 mg., five days of THC and five days of placebo in randomized order, divided by a two-day washout period. Subjective ratings of spasticity and side effects were completed and semiquantitative neurological examinations were performed. At doses greater than 7.5 mg there was significant improvement in patient ratings of spasticity compared to placebo. These positive findings in a treatment failure population suggest a role for THC in the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis.

Authors
- Consroe P, Musty R, Rein J, Tillery W, Pertwee R
Title
- The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
Language
- Eng
Date
- 1997
Issue
- 0014-3022
Source
- Eur Neurol
Pages
- 44-8
Country
- SWITZERLAND
Abstract
- Fifty-three UK and 59 USA people with multiple sclerosis (MS) answered anonymously the first questionnaire on cannabis use and MS. From 97 to 30% of the subjects reported cannabis improved (in descending rank order): spasticity, chronic pain of extremities, acute paroxysmal phenomenon, tremor, emotional dysfunction, anorexia/weight loss, fatigue states, double vision, sexual dysfunction, bowel and bladder dysfunctions, vision dimness, dysfunctions of walking and balance, and memory loss. The MS subjects surveyed have specific therapeutic reasons for smoking cannabis. The survey findings will aid in the design of a clinical trial of cannabis or cannabinoid administration to MS patients or to other patients with similar signs or symptoms.
Research Institute
- Department of Pharmacology/Toxicology, University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson 85721-0207, USA. consroe@pharmacy.arizona.edu
Source
- Eur Neurol 1997;38(1):44-8

Authors
- Brenneisen R, Egli A, Elsohly MA, Henn V, Spiess Y
Title
- The effect of orally and rectally administered delta 9- tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity: a pilot study with 2 patients.
Language
- Eng
Date
- 1996 Oct
Issue
- 0946-1965
Source
- Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther
Pages
- 446-52
Country
- GERMANY
Abstract
- Multiple doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) capsules (Marinol) and THC hemisuccinate suppositories were administered in 24-hour intervals to 2 patients with organically caused spasticity. After oral doses of 10-15 mg THC, peak plasma levels from 2.1 to 16.9 ng/ml THC and 74.5 to 244.0 ng/ml 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH, major THC metabolite) were measured by GC/MS within 1-8 h and 2-8 h, respectively. After rectal doses of 2.5-5 mg THC, peak plasma levels from 1.1 to 4.1 ng/ml THC and 6.1 to 42.0 ng/ml THC-COOH were measured within 2-8 h and 1-8 h, respectively. The bioavailability resulting from the oral formulation was 45-53% relative to the rectal route of administration, due to a lower absorption and higher first- pass metabolism. The effect of THC on spasticity, rigidity, and pain was estimated by objective neurological tests (Ashworth scale, walking ability) and patient self-rating protocols. Oral and rectal THC reduced at a progressive stage of illness the spasticity, rigidity, and pain, resulting in improved active and passive mobility. The relative effectiveness of the oral vs. the rectal formulation was 25-50%. Physiological and psychological parameters were used to monitor psychotropic and somatic side-effects of THC. No differences in the concentration ability, mood, and function of the cardiovascular system could be observed after administration of THC.
Research Institute
- Institute of Pharmacy, University of Bern, Switzerland.
Source
- Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther 1996 Oct;34(10):446-52