Research Index | Medline Index


Cannabis Research - Medical Uses - anti-viral/anti-bacterial


Authors
Blevins RD, Dumic MP
Title
The effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on herpes simplex virus replication.
Source
Journal of General Virology
Date
1980 Aug
Issue
49(2)
Pages
427-31
Abstract
Both herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) failed, in an identical fashion to replicate and produce extensive c.p.e. in human cell monolayer cultures which were exposed (8 h before infection, at infection, or 8 h p.i.) to various concentrations of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Similar results were obtained with a plaque assay utilizing confluent monkey cells. Possible mechanisms for this antiviral activity are discussed.

Authors
Turner CE, Elsohly MA
Title
Biological activity of cannabichromene, its homologs and isomers.
Source
Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Date
1981 Aug-Sep
Issue
21(8-9 Suppl)
Pages
283S-291S
Abstract
Cannabichromene (CBC) is one of four major cannabinoids in Cannabis sativa L. and is the second most abundant cannabinoid in drug-type cannabis. Cannabichromene and some of its homologs, analogs, and isomers were evaluated for antiinflammatory, antibacterial, and antifungal activity. Antiinflammatory activity was evaluated by the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and the erythrocyte membrane stabilization method. In both tests, CBC was superior to phenylbutazone. Antibacterial activity of CBC and its isomers and homologs was evaluated using gram-positive, gram-negative, and acid-fast bacteria. Antifungal activity was evaluated using yeast-like and filamentous fungi and a dermatophyte. Antibacterial activity was strong, and the antifungal activity was mild to moderate.

Authors
Lancz G, Specter S, Brown HK
Title
Suppressive effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on herpes simplex virus infectivity in vitro.
Source
Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology & Medicine
Date
1991 Apr
Issue
196(4)
Pages
401-4
Abstract
Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) was found to reduce the infectivity of herpes simplex virus and was without effect against adenovirus type 2 or poliovirus. The effective THC concentration resulting in an 80% decrement in virus viability was dependent upon the presence or absence of serum in the incubation mixture, as a 5% serum concentration decreased the drug activity by approximately 50-fold. THC-mediated inactivation of herpes simplex virus was both time and dose dependent and did not result in virion disassembly or clumping. The THC-related effect was not influenced by the pH of the suspending medium, suggesting that the mechanism of inactivation differed from that associated with the thermal inactivation of the virus. Thus, the data suggest that THC preferentially reduces the infectivity of the enveloped herpes simplex virus, and that this activity is modulated by the presence of serum proteins.

Id Code
76251508
Authors
Van Klingeren B, Ten Ham M
Title
Antibacterial activity of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol.
Source
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek
Date
1976
Issue
42(1-2)
Pages
9-12
Abstract
The minimum inhibiting concentrations (MIC) of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) for staphylococci and streptococci in broth are in the range of 1-5 mug/ml. In the same range, both compounds are also bactericidal. In media containing 4% serum or 5% blood the antibacterial activity is strongly reduced (MIC 50 mug/ml). Gram-negative bacteria are resistant to THC and CBD.