Research Index | Medline Index


Cannabis Research - Medical Uses - other medical uses


Authors
Schurr A, Rigor BM
Title
Cannabis extract, but not delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol, inhibits human brain and liver monoamine oxidase.
Source
General Pharmacology
Date
1984
Issue
15(2)
Pages
171-4
Abstract
Mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) of human brain and liver was inhibited by low concentrations of cannabis extract (CE) and a cannabinoid fraction isolated from it. delta 1-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) did not elicit any inhibitory effect on the enzyme. The inhibition of MAO activity by CE and by its active fraction was more pronounced when the monoamine substrates 2-phenylethylamine (PEA) and benzylamine (BA) were used, as compared to the inhibition of the enzyme activity when 5-hydroxytryptamine was the substrate. The active cannabinoid fraction was found to be more potent than CE in inhibiting the activity of MAO with either substrate. The isolated fraction contains at least two cannabinoids with Rf values of 0.67 and 0.71 on silica gel thin layer chromatography (TLC), as determined with toluene/chloroform/methanol (100:10:1, by volume) as the solvent system. The findings of this study emphasize the need for further exploration of the potential of cannabis as a source for therapeutic agents.

Authors
Moss DE, McMaster SB, Rogers J
Title
Tetrahydrocannabinol potentiates reserpine-induced hypokinesia.
Source
Pharmacology, Biochemistry & Behavior
Date
1981 Nov
Issue
15(5)
Pages
779-83
Abstract
Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a substance in marihuana, was found to produce a profound potentiation of reserpine-induced hypokinesia in rats as measured with a bar test. In these experiments, THC had no hypokinetic effect by itself but produced a more than 20-fold increase in the hypokinesia produced by reserpine. Reserpine-induced hypokinesia has been viewed as animal model of Parkinson's Disease. THC potentiation of reserpine-induced hypokinesia was observed to be both time- and dose-dependent (1 to 10 mg/kg THC). When administered by gavage to reserpine-pretreated subjects (7.5 mg/kg IP, 24 hours before), THC produced a potentiation of hypokinesia that developed fully within 1 hour, lasted at least 5 hours, and was absent by 12 hours after THC administration. This THC effect was slightly increased by physostigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, relatively unaffected by scopolamine, a muscarinic antagonist, and almost completely blocked by ethopropazine, an anticholinergic antiparkinson drug. The effect was completely unaffected by naloxone. Insofar as reserpine has been used with some clinical efficacy in hyperkinetic movement disorders such as Huntington's disease and tardive dyskinesia, it may be that potentiation of reserpine's hypokinetic effect by a drug such as THC could greatly increase the clinical value of reserpine or related drugs in the treatment of these disorders.

Authors
Turner CE, Elsohly MA
Title
Biological activity of cannabichromene, its homologs and isomers.
Source
Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Date
1981 Aug-Sep
Issue
21(8-9 Suppl)
Pages
283S-291S
Abstract
Cannabichromene (CBC) is one of four major cannabinoids in Cannabis sativa L. and is the second most abundant cannabinoid in drug-type cannabis. Cannabichromene and some of its homologs, analogs, and isomers were evaluated for antiinflammatory, antibacterial, and antifungal activity. Antiinflammatory activity was evaluated by the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and the erythrocyte membrane stabilization method. In both tests, CBC was superior to phenylbutazone. Antibacterial activity of CBC and its isomers and homologs was evaluated using gram-positive, gram-negative, and acid-fast bacteria. Antifungal activity was evaluated using yeast-like and filamentous fungi and a dermatophyte. Antibacterial activity was strong, and the antifungal activity was mild to moderate.

Id Code
80107996
Authors
Pringle HL, Bradley SG, Harris LS
Title
Susceptibility of Naegleria fowleri to delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.
Source
Antimicrobial Agents & Chemotherapy
Date
1979 Nov
Issue
16(5)
Pages
674-9
Abstract
Growth of the pathogenic amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri is inhibited by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC). delta 9-THC is amoebostatic at 5 to 50 micrograms/ml. delta 9-THC prevents enflagellation and encystment, but does not impair amoeboid movement. Calf serum at 10 and 20% (vol/vol) reduces the antiamoeba activity of delta 9-THC. Only 1-methoxy delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol, of 17 cannabinoids tested, failed to inhibit growth of N. fowleri. Antinaeglerial activity was not markedly altered by opening the pyran ring, by converting the cyclohexyl ring to an aromatic ring, or by reversing the hydroxyl and pentyl groups on the benzene ring. delta 9-THC prevented the cytopathic effect of N. fowleri on African green monkey (Vero) cells and human epithelioma (HEp-2) cells in culture. delta 9-THC afforded modest protection to mice infected with N. fowleri.

[Stedman's Medical Dictionary:
Naegleria
A genus of free-living soil, water, and sewage ameba (order Schizopyrenida, family Vahlkampfiidae) one species of which, Naegleria fowleri, has been implicated as the causative agent of the rapidly fatal primary amebic meningoencephalitis. Infection has been traced to swimming pools (including indoor chlorinated pools); entry is by the nasal mucosa, from which the amebae reach the meninges and brain through the cribriform plate and olfactory nerves. Other soil amebae that have been implicated, although of far less epidemiological significance, include the genera Acanthamoeba and Hartmanella, the latter being a suspected but unproved causative agent. ]

Id Code
79033994
Authors
Sofia RD, Diamantis W, Harrison JE, Melton J
Title
Evaluation of antiulcer activity of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the Shay rat test.
Source
Pharmacology
Date
1978
Issue
17(3)
Pages
173-7
Abstract
delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) inhibited ulcer formation in the pylorus-ligated rat (Shay rat test). However, this antiulcer activity of THC was substantially less than for the anticholinergic substance tridihexethyl chloride both in terms of degree of activity and potency. In addition, the results of the present study suggested different mechanism(s) of action for the antiulcer effects of these substances.

Id Code
78255843
Authors
Kosersky DS
Title
Antihypertensive effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol.
Source
Archives Internationales de Pharmacodynamie et de Therapie
Date
1978 May
Issue
233(1)
Pages
76-81
Abstract
Repeated oral administration of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC, 25 mg/kg) reduced systolic blood pressure in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats. Tolerance to the antihypertensive actions of delta9-THC failed to develop during the 10-day treatment period. The failure of delta9-THC to alter blood pressure in normotensive rats suggests that the hypotensive action of delta9-THC is dependent, in part, on baseline blood pressure.

Id Code
77156324
Authors
Sofia RD, Knobloch LC, Harakal JJ, Erikson DJ
Title
Comparative diuretic activity of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabinol and hydrochlorothiazide in the rat.
Source
Archives Internationales de Pharmacodynamie et de Therapie
Date
1977 Jan
Issue
225(1)
Pages
77-87
Abstract
Orally administered delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produced a dose-dependent increase in urine output in hydrated rats similar in mg/kg potency and magnitude of effect to hydrochlorothiazide (HCT). Whereas HCT promoted marked excretion of Na+, K+ and Cl- and an increase in the urinary Na+/K+ at all diuretic doses (1.25-20.0 mg/kg), THC had only a slight effect on Na+ and K+ excretion but not Cl- even after the highest dose tested (20.0 mg/kg). Hypophysectomy and adrenalectomy abolished the diuretic effect of THC, thus suggesting both central and peripheral sites of action for the diuretic effect of THC. Tolerance to the effect on urine output by THC developed after 15 days of repeated dosing, while urine output and electrolyte excretion remained significantly elevated after 25 days of HCT administration.

Id Code
77079545
Authors
McLendon DM, Harris RT, Maule WF
Title
Suppression of the cardiac conditioned response by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol: a comparison with other drugs.
Source
Psychopharmacology
Date
1976 Nov 10
Issue
50(2)
Pages
159-63
Abstract
Using classical conditioning procedures, the cardiac conditioned response (CCR) was established by pairing one of two tones with the delivery of a peripheral electric shock in Rhesus monkeys. The other tone had no terminal consequence. Such a procedure results in an anticipatory 'anxiety' or 'fear' response to the impending shock signalled by the reinforced tone. The heart rate before the tone in two of the animals was characterized by tachycardia and by bradycardia in the other animal. The effect of intravenous Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) was compared to various doses of diazepam, chlorpromazine, and morphine. The results indicate that THC blocks the CCR in a does-related manner. The effects of THC were similar to diazepam, an anti-anxiety drug. Chlorpromazine and morphine affected the conditioned response in an unreliable manner, and both drugs would attenuate the response in some cases and potentiate it in other instances.

Id Code
76231334
Authors
Hanna JM, Strauss RH, Itagaki B, Kwon WJ, Stanyon R, Bindon J, Hong SK
Title
Marijuana smoking and cold tolerance in man.
Source
Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine
Date
1976 Jun
Issue
47(6)
Pages
634-9
Abstract
Ten men who were marijuana users served as subjects in a study of the effects of marijuana smoking on response to cold. Cold water (28 degrees C for 60 min) and cold air (20 degrees C for 120 min) mediums were utilized with three exposures in each medium. The three exposures followed smoking marijuana, smoking placebo, and a no-smoking control period. Additionally, a breathhold experiment preceded and followed the four smoking periods. Marijuana and placebo smoke were inhaled from a spirometer with each man receiving the smoke of 0.739 g of marijuana and placebo. Smoking marijuana did not greatly modify body heat content, since rectal temperature and most peripheral temperatures were not altered. However, temperatures over voluntary muscles likely to be involved in shivering were elevated. Heat production also greatly increased after marijuana, suggesting that it had stimulated shivering. Marijuana also produced tachycardia and abolished apneic bradycardia. The mechanism of this action is not clear, but some sympathetic involvement is indicated.

Id Code
85225690
Authors
Barrett ML, Gordon D, Evans FJ
Title
Isolation from Cannabis sativa L. of cannflavin--a novel inhibitor of prostaglandin production.
Source
Biochemical Pharmacology
Date
1985 Jun 1
Issue
34(11)
Pages
2019-24
Abstract
The isolation from Cannabis sativa L. of an inhibitor of prostaglandin (PG) E2 production by cultured rheumatoid synovial cells is described. This agent, for which the name Cannflavin has been coined, is distinct from cannabinoids on the basis of isolation procedure, preliminary structural analysis and biological properties. The activity of Cannflavin has been compared with several established anti-inflammatory drugs and the major cannabinoids.

Id Code
86104502
Authors
Sethi BB, Trivedi JK, Kumar P, Gulati A, Agarwal AK, Sethi N
Title
Antianxiety effect of cannabis: involvement of central benzodiazepine receptors.
Source
Biological Psychiatry
Date
1986 Jan
Issue
21(1)
Pages
3-10
Abstract
The present work, involving clinical, behavioral, and biochemical studies, was undertaken to elucidate the probable mechanism of the observed antianxiety effects of cannabis. The population for the clinical study consisted of 50 male chronic cannabis users who were otherwise healthy and 50 matched controls. When evaluated on Taylor's Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMA), these subjects had low anxiety scores as compared with the controls. To explore the possible interaction of cannabis with the benzodiazepine receptors, behavioral and biochemical studies in mice were devised, involving acute and chronic cannabis administration. Behavioral study revealed that mice under chronic cannabis treatment scored significantly higher on foot shock-induced aggression, but this was significantly blocked by benzodiazepine receptor antagonist. Furthermore, chronic cannabis treatment significantly (p less than 0.001) increased the frequency of licking response periodically punished by shocks. This confirms the antianxiety effect of cannabis, which also appears to be mediated through a benzodiazepine receptor, as it was reduced significantly (p less than 0.001) by a benzodiazepine receptor blocker. Specific 3H-diazepam binding was carried out in frontal cortex to assess both the population and affinity of benzodiazepine receptors. Our results indicate that acute cannabis treatment has no significant effect, whereas chronic cannabis treatment significantly increased 3H-diazepam binding as compared with controls. Scatchard analysis further reveals that increased affinity is responsible for increased binding to these receptors. It is therefore our contention that the antianxiety effect of cannabis is mediated through central benzodiazepine receptors.

Id Code
87082581
Authors
Consroe P, Sandyk R, Snider SR
Title
Open label evaluation of cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders.
Source
International Journal of Neuroscience
Date
1986 Nov
Issue
30(4)
Pages
277-82
Abstract
Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid of Cannabis, was given to 5 patients with dystonic movement disorders in a preliminary open pilot study. Oral doses of CBD rising from 100 to 600 mg/day over a 6 week period were administered along with standard medication. Dose-related improvement in dystonia was observed in all patients and ranged from 20 to 50%. Side-effects of CBD were mild and included hypotension, dry mouth, psychomotor slowing, lightheadedness, and sedation. In 2 patients with coexisting Parkinsonian features, CBD at doses over 300 mg/day exacerbated the hypokinesia and resting tremor. CBD appears to have antidystonic and Parkinsonism-aggravating effects in humans.

Id Code
95208198
Authors
Nok AJ, Ibrahim S, Arowosafe S, Longdet I, Ambrose A, Onyenekwe PC, Whong CZ
Title
The trypanocidal effect of Cannabis sativa constituents in experimental animal trypanosomiasis.
Source
Veterinary & Human Toxicology
Date
1994 Dec
Issue
36(6)
Pages
522-4
Abstract
The effect of Cannabis sativa on trypanosome-infected rats was examined. An aqueous extract of the seeds administered at a dose of 50 mg/kg/d cured animals infected with Trypanosome brucei brucei of blood stream parasites. Six fractions eluted from the crude extract by column chromatography were assessed for trypanocidal properties. Of these, only 2 fractions retained trypanocidal activity by curing mice infected with T brucei brucei.

Id Code
94308864
Authors
Nelson K, Walsh D, Deeter P, Sheehan F
Title
A phase II study of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol for appetite stimulation in cancer-associated anorexia. [Review]
Source
Journal of Palliative Care
Date
1994 Spring
Issue
10(1)
Pages
14-8
Abstract
Purpose: To evaluate the appetite-stimulating properties of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in patients with anorexia due to advanced cancer. Patients and methods: Nineteen patients with various malignancies were entered. All had cancer-associated anorexia and a life expectancy greater than four weeks. Patients were started on THC 2.5 mg p.o. t.i.d. one hour after meals for four weeks. Evaluations for side effects, efficacy, acceptability and satisfaction were conducted at two and four weeks. Results: 18 patients were evaluable. Ten patients completed the entire 28-day study. Four patients experienced grade I toxicity and three withdrew at their request. Thirteen patients reported an improved appetite. Conclusion: THC is an effective appetite stimulant in patients with advanced cancer. It is well tolerated at low doses. Further studies are needed to determine the most appropriate dose and the specific population most likely to respond.
References
19

Id Code
93372440
Authors
Struwe M, Kaempfer SH, Geiger CJ, Pavia AT, Plasse TF, Shepard KV, Ries K, Evans TG
Title
Effect of dronabinol on nutritional status in HIV infection.
Source
Annals of Pharmacotherapy
Date
1993 Jul-Aug
Issue
27(7-8)
Pages
827-31
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of dronabinol (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) on appetite and nutritional status in patients with symptomatic HIV infection and weight loss. DESIGN: Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial with two five-week treatment periods separated by a two-week washout period. Patients received dronabinol 5 mg twice daily before meals or placebo. SETTING: A university-based HIV/AIDS clinic and a large infectious disease private practice largely devoted to care of patients with HIV. PARTICIPANTS: Twelve HIV-infected patients who had had at least a 2.25-kg weight loss participated in the study. Five patients completed the protocol, and seven withdrew (two because of drug intolerance, two because of disease progression, two because of noncompliance, and one because of experimental antiretroviral therapy). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Main outcome measures included caloric intake, weight, percent body fat, serum prealbumin, and symptom distress. RESULTS: During dronabinol treatment, subjects experienced increased percent body fat (one percent, p = 0.04); decreased symptom distress (p = 0.04); and trends toward weight gain (0.5 kg, p = 0.13), increased prealbumin (29.0 mg/L, p = 0.11), and improved appetite score (p = 0.14). CONCLUSIONS: In a selected group of HIV-infected patients with weight loss, short-term treatment with dronabinol may result in improvement in nutritional status and symptom distress.

Authors
- Russo E
Title
- Cannabis for migraine treatment: the once and future prescription? An historical and scientific review [In Process Citation]
Language
- Eng
Date
- 1998 May
Issue
- 0304-3959
Source
- Pain
Pages
- 3-8
Country
- NETHERLANDS
Abstract
- Cannabis, or Marijuana, has been used for centuries for both symptomatic and prophylactic treatment of migraine. It was highly esteemed as a headache remedy by the most prominent physicians of the age between 1874 and 1942, remaining part of the Western pharmacopoeia for this indication even into the mid-twentieth century. Current ethnobotanical and anecdotal references continue to refer to its efficacy for this malady, while biochemical studies of THC and anandamide have provided a scientific basis for such treatment. The author believes that controlled clinical trials of Cannabis in acute migraine treatment are warranted.
Research Institute
- Department of Neurology, Western Montana Clinic, Missoula 58907-7609, USA. ptm5739@montana.com
Source
- Pain 1998 May;76(1-2):3-8

Authors
- Feldman HW, Mandel J
Title
- Providing medical marijuana: the importance of cannabis clubs [In Process Citation]
Language
- Eng
Date
- 1998 Apr-Jun
Issue
- 0279-1072
Source
- J Psychoactive Drugs
Pages
- 179-86
Country
- UNITED STATES
Abstract
- In 1996, shortly after the San Francisco Cannabis Club was raided and (temporarily) closed by state authorities, the authors conducted an ethnographic study by interviewing selected former members to ascertain how they had benefited from the use of medical marijuana and how they had utilized the clubs. Interviews were augmented by participant observation techniques. Respondents reported highly positive health benefits from marijuana itself, and underscored even greater benefits from the social aspects of the clubs, which they described as providing important emotional supports. As such, cannabis clubs serve as crucial support mechanisms/groups for people with a wide variety of serious illnesses and conditions. The authors concluded that of the various methods so far proposed, the cannabis clubs afford the best therapeutic setting for providing medical cannabis and for offering a healing environment composed of like-minded, sympathetic friends.
Research Institute
- The National Association of Ethnography and Social Policy, Oakland, California 94611, USA.
Source
- J Psychoactive Drugs 1998 Apr-Jun;30(2):179-86

Authors
- Grinspoon L, Bakalar JB
Title
- The use of cannabis as a mood stabilizer in bipolar disorder: anecdotal evidence and the need for clinical research [In Process Citation]
Language
- Eng
Date
- 1998 Apr-Jun
Issue
- 0279-1072
Source
- J Psychoactive Drugs
Pages
- 171-7
Country
- UNITED STATES
Abstract
- The authors present case histories indicating that a number of patients find cannabis (marihuana) useful in the treatment of their bipolar disorder. Some used it to treat mania, depression, or both. They stated that it was more effective than conventional drugs, or helped relieve the side effects of those drugs. One woman found that cannabis curbed her manic rages; she and her husband have worked to make it legally available as a medicine. Others described the use of cannabis as a supplement to lithium (allowing reduced consumption) or for relief of lithium's side effects. Another case illustrates the fact that medical cannabis users are in danger of arrest, especially when children are encouraged to inform on parents by some drug prevention programs. An analogy is drawn between the status of cannabis today and that of lithium in the early 1950s, when its effect on mania had been discovered but there were no controlled studies. In the case of cannabis, the law has made such studies almost impossible, and the only available evidence is anecdotal. The potential for cannabis as a treatment for bipolar disorder unfortunately can not be fully explored in the present social circumstances.
Research Institute
- Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
Source
- J Psychoactive Drugs 1998 Apr-Jun;30(2):171-7

Authors
- Hampson AJ, Grimaldi M, Axelrod J, Wink D
Title
- Cannabidiol and (-)Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol are neuroprotective antioxidants.
Language
- Eng
Date
- 1998 Jul 7
Issue
- 0027-8424
Source
- Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Pages
- 8268-73
Country
- UNITED STATES
Abstract
- The neuroprotective actions of cannabidiol and other cannabinoids were examined in rat cortical neuron cultures exposed to toxic levels of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. Glutamate toxicity was reduced by both cannabidiol, a nonpsychoactive constituent of marijuana, and the psychotropic cannabinoid (-)Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabinoids protected equally well against neurotoxicity mediated by N- methyl-D-aspartate receptors, 2-amino-3-(4-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-5- yl)propionic acid receptors, or kainate receptors. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-induced toxicity has been shown to be calcium dependent; this study demonstrates that 2-amino-3-(4-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-5- yl)propionic acid/kainate receptor-type neurotoxicity is also calcium- dependent, partly mediated by voltage sensitive calcium channels. The neuroprotection observed with cannabidiol and THC was unaffected by cannabinoid receptor antagonist, indicating it to be cannabinoid receptor independent. Previous studies have shown that glutamate toxicity may be prevented by antioxidants. Cannabidiol, THC and several synthetic cannabinoids all were demonstrated to be antioxidants by cyclic voltametry. Cannabidiol and THC also were shown to prevent hydroperoxide-induced oxidative damage as well as or better than other antioxidants in a chemical (Fenton reaction) system and neuronal cultures. Cannabidiol was more protective against glutamate neurotoxicity than either ascorbate or alpha-tocopherol, indicating it to be a potent antioxidant. These data also suggest that the naturally occurring, nonpsychotropic cannabinoid, cannabidiol, may be a potentially useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of oxidative neurological disorders such as cerebral ischemia.
Research Institute
- Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Regulation, National Institutes of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
Source
- Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1998 Jul 7;95(14):8268-73

Authors
- Muller-Vahl KR, Kolbe H, Dengler R
Title
- [Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Effect of nicotine, alcohol and marihuana on clinical symptoms]
Language
- Ger
Date
- 1997 Dec
Issue
- 0028-2804
Source
- Nervenarzt
Pages
- 985-9
Country
- GERMANY
Abstract
- Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric spectrum disorder of unknown etiology. While several studies have provided evidence that nicotine causes an improvement, only anecdotal reports suggest that alcohol and marijuana influence the symptomatology. Using a structured interview, we questioned a larger group of patients with Tourette syndrome (n = 47) about the use of nicotine, alcohol, and marijuana and their subjective experiences. Of 28 smoking patients only 2 (7%) reported a tic reduction when smoking. Of 35 patients drinking alcohol 24 (69%) noted an improvement. Thirteen patients reported the use of marijuana, of whom 11 (85%) noted a marked improvement. Our results provided strong evidence that the use of both alcohol and marijuana causes much more improvement in TS than nicotine smoking. We suggest that marijuana influences an assumed interaction between cannabinoid and dopamine receptors and, by this, influences the dopaminergic processes in basal ganglia and motor activity.
Research Institute
- Neurologische Klinik mit Klinischer Neurophysiologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover.
Original Title
- Gilles de la Tourette-Syndrom. Einfluss von Nikotin, Alkohol und Marihuana auf die klinische Symptomatik.
Source
- Nervenarzt 1997 Dec;68(12):985-9

Authors
- Volicer L, Stelly M, Morris J, McLaughlin J, Volicer BJ
Title
- Effects of dronabinol on anorexia and disturbed behavior in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
Language
- Eng
Date
- 1997 Sep
Issue
- 0885-6230
Source
- Int J Geriatr Psychiatry
Pages
- 913-9
Country
- ENGLAND
Abstract
- A placebo-controlled crossover design, with each treatment period lasting 6 weeks, was used to investigate effects of dronabinol in 15 patients with a diagnosis of probable Alzhemer's disease who were refusing food. Eleven patients completed both study periods; one patient who died of a heart attack 2 weeks before the end of the study was also included in the analysis. The study was terminated in 3 patients: one developed a grand mal seizure and 2 developed serious intercurrent infections. Body weight of study subjects increased more during the dronabinol treatment than during the placebo periods. Dronabinol treatment decreased severity of disturbed behavior and this effect persisted during the placebo period in patients who received dronabinol first. Adverse reactions observed more commonly during the dronabinol treatment than during placebo periods included euphoria, somnolence and tiredness, but did not require discontinuation of therapy. These results indicate that dronabinol is a promising novel therapeutic agent which may be useful not only for treatment of anorexia but also to improve disturbed behavior in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
Research Institute
- E. N. Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital, Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center, Bedford, MA 01730, USA.
Source
- Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 1997 Sep;12(9):913-9

Authors
- Beal JE, Olson R, Lefkowitz L, Laubenstein L, Bellman P, Yangco B, Morales JO, Murphy R, Powderly W, Plasse TF, Mosdell KW, Shepard KV
Title
- Long-term efficacy and safety of dronabinol for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated anorexia.
Language
- Eng
Date
- 1997 Jul
Issue
- 0885-3924
Source
- J Pain Symptom Manage
Pages
- 7-14
Country
- UNITED STATES
Abstract
- We studied the effects of long-term (12 months) dronabinol in 94 late- stage acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients (mean CD4 count of 45/mm3) who previously participated in a 6-week study (placebo versus dronabinol). All patients received dronabinol orally-2.5 mg twice daily (90%) or 2.5 mg once daily (10%). Appetite was measured using a visual analogue scale for hunger (VASH). Dronabinol was associated with consistent improvement in mean appetite. Patients previously treated with dronabinol continued to show improvement in VASH (percent change from baseline of 6-week trial: 48.6-76.1% at each month), whereas those previously treated with placebo exhibited substantial improvement in mean appetite, particularly during the initial 4 months of treatment (48.5-69.9%). Thereafter, dronabinol was associated with a VASH change at least twice baseline. Patients tended toward stable body weight for at least 7 months. Adverse events were primarily related to known central nervous system effects of dronabinol. These data support long-term, safe use of dronabinol for anorexia associated with weight loss in patients with AIDS.
Research Institute
- St. John's Hospital, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.
Source
- J Pain Symptom Manage 1997 Jul;14(1):7-14

Authors
- Dansak DA
Title
- Medical use of recreational drugs by AIDS patients.
Language
- Eng
Date
- 1997
Issue
- 1055-0887
Source
- J Addict Dis
Pages
- 25-30
Country
- UNITED STATES
Abstract
- A survey of 72 patients at an AIDS clinic regarding self-medication with recreational drugs for medical or psychological conditions related to their illness disclosed that marijuana was the primary drug used. The perceived benefit was for gastrointestinal conditions such as nausea, vomiting, indigestion and appetite improvement. Use of other "recreational" drugs as self-medication was reported to usually be ineffective or to worsen the condition they sought to help. Fifty-eight percent of patients reported some attempt to self-medicate. Thirty-two percent were currently using marijuana, and most admitted to pre-AIDS marijuana use. Fifty-seven percent of the sample reported some pre-AIDS drug use, primarily alcohol and marijuana. Results are discussed in terms of potential clinical problems arising from continued recreational drug use among AIDS patients.
Research Institute
- Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of South Alabama, Mobile 36693, USA.
Source
- J Addict Dis 1997;16(3):25-30