Research Index | Medline Index


Cannabis Research - Medical Uses - anti-cancer


Id Code
76007672
Authors
Munson AE, Harris LS, Friedman MA, Dewey WL, Carchman RA
Title
Antineoplastic activity of cannabinoids.
Source
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Date
1975 Sep
Issue
55(3)
Pages
597-602
Abstract
Lewis lung adenocarcinoma growth was retarded by the oral administration of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), delta8-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta8-THC), and cannabinol (CBN), but not cannabidiol (CBD). Animals treated for 10 consecutive days with delta9-THC, beginning the day after tumor implantation, demonstrated a dose-dependent action of retarded tumor growth. Mice treated for 20 consecutive days with delta8-THC and CBN had reduced primary tumor size. CBD showed no inhibitory effect on tumor growth at 14, 21, or 28 days. Delta9-THC, delta8-THC, and CBN increased the mean survival time (36% at 100 mg/kg, 25% at 200 mg/kg, and 27% at 50 mg/kg, respectively), whereas CBD did not. Delta9-THC administered orally daily until death in doses of 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg did not increase the life-spans of (C57BL/6 times DBA/2)F1 (BDF1) mice hosting the L1210 murine leukemia. However, delta9-THC administered daily for 10 days significantly inhibited Friend leukemia virus-induced splenomegaly by 71% at 200 mg/kg as compared to 90.2% for actinomycin D. Experiments with bone marrow and isolated Lewis lung cells incubated in vitro with delta9-THC and delta8-THC showed a dose-dependent (10(-4)-10(-7)) inhibition (80-20%, respectively) of tritiated thymidine and 14C-uridine uptake into these cells. CBD was active only in high concentrations (10(-4)).

Id Code
79001504
Authors
Friedman MA
Title
In vivo effects of cannabinoids on macromolecular biosynthesis in Lewis lung carcinomas.
Source
Cancer Biochemistry Biophysics
Date
1977
Issue
2(2)
Pages
51-4
Abstract
Cannabinoids represent a novel class of drugs active in increasing the life span mice carrying Lewis lung tumors and decreasing primary tumor size. In the present studies, the effects of delta9-THC, delta8-THC, and cannabidiol on tumor macromolecular biosynthesis were studied. These drugs inhibit thymidine-3H incorporation into DNA acutely, but did not inhibit leucine uptake into tumor protein. At 24 h after treatment, cannabinoids did not inhibit thymidine-3H incorporation into DNA, leucine-3H uptake into protein or cytidine-3H into RNA.

Id Code
90154634
Authors
Watson ES
Title
The effect of marijuana smoke exposure on murine sarcoma 180 survival in Fisher rats.
Source
Immunopharmacology & Immunotoxicology
Date
1989
Issue
11(2-3)
Pages
211-22
Abstract
Fisher rats were treated for 28 or 60 days to multiple exposures to the smoke of marijuana or marijuana placebo cigarettes. Primary, secondary and in some instances tertiary tumor implants were performed. Murine sarcoma 180 tumor cells (7.5 x 10(7)) were implanted subcutaneously on day 1, 14 and 28 following initiation of smoke exposure (28 day studies) or on day 1, 14 after cessation of smoke exposure (60 day studies). Tumor areas were measured on alternate days beginning on the second or third day after implantation for 13 or 14 days. Exposure to both marijuana and placebo smoke for 28 days (6, 9 and 18 cigarettes per day) resulted in suppressed growth of secondary and tertiary implants. Administration of delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (50 mg/kg, i.p., 20 days) failed to suppress the growth of primary and secondary tumors. This suggests that noncannabinoid constituents of the smoke may contribute to the suppression of tumor growth. Exposure of rats to 9, but not 4 or 6, marijuana or placebo cigarettes per day for 60 days suppressed the growth of primary but not secondary tumors. Thus, the effects of smoke exposure appear to be lost by two weeks after cessation of treatment. The possible existence of a non-cannabinoid immunostimulant in the smoke is discussed.

Authors
- De Petrocellis L, Melck D, Palmisano A, Bisogno T, Laezza C, Bifulco M, Di Marzo V
Title
- The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation.
Language
- Eng
Date
- 1998 Jul 7
Issue
- 0027-8424
Source
- Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Pages
- 8375-80
Country
- UNITED STATES
Abstract
- Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of "central" CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 microM and 83-92% maximal inhibition at 5-10 microM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 microM anandamide. The anti-proliferative effect of anandamide was not due to toxicity or to apoptosis of cells but was accompanied by a reduction of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. A stable analogue of anandamide (R)-methanandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 also inhibited EFM-19 cell proliferation, whereas arachidonic acid was much less effective. These cannabimimetic substances displaced the binding of the selective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP 55, 940 to EFM-19 membranes with an order of potency identical to that observed for the inhibition of EFM-19 cell proliferation. Moreover, anandamide cytostatic effect was inhibited by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Cell proliferation was arrested by a prolactin mAb and enhanced by exogenous human prolactin, whose mitogenic action was reverted by very low (0.1-0.5 microM) doses of anandamide. Anandamide suppressed the levels of the long form of the prolactin receptor in both EFM-19 and MCF-7 cells, as well as a typical prolactin-induced response, i.e., the expression of the breast cancer cell susceptibility gene brca1. These data suggest that anandamide blocks human breast cancer cell proliferation through CB1-like receptor- mediated inhibition of endogenous prolactin action at the level of prolactin receptor.
Research Institute
- Istituto di Cibernetica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Toiano 6, 80072 Arco Felice, Naples, Italy.
Source
- Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1998 Jul 7;95(14):8375-80